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    Information on the Coronavirus

    New guidance for booster vaccinations In response to concerns about the new Omicron variant, the JCVI has recommended that booster vaccinations should be offered to all adults and that the gap between the second dose and booster is reduced to a minimum of 3 months.
    People who are severely immunosuppressed and have had their 3rd dose will also be offered a booster, a minimum of 3 months after their third dose.
    These recommendations will come into effect from 13 December. As before, people will be prioritised according to age and risk, and the NHS will contact you when it is your turn for your booster.
    Unfortunately we are not able to offer boosters to people under 40 due to the need to maintain other vital primary care services.
    However, there are a number of local vaccination services available which you will be able to choose from using the NHS National Booking Service.
    If you are aged 40 or over or in an at risk group and had your second dose 6 months ago, you can book your booster now at
    www.nhs.uk/covidvaccine or by calling 119.
    Otherwise, please wait to be contacted

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Information on Coronavirus

Patients must wear a mask at all times when in the building.
For further details regarding Coronavirus advice please go to www.gov.uk/coronavirus

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Leeds Directory

Leeds Care Services Directory 2020 links to services supporting independent living Carers Leeds, Grants to help Carers take a break, Leeds City Council
Telephone 0113 246 8338
Mon – Fri 10pm – 4pm

Information Leaflets

Browse or search for patient information leaflets on health, conditions and diseases provided by Patient. Each leaflet is written by an expert team of GPs and contains trusted, high quality health information.

When to see a doctor

When unsure about the need to see a doctor or other professional, people can sometimes call their primary care doctor for guidance. Some doctors can be contacted by e-mail for nonemergency questions. Others prefer to be contacted by telephone. Doctors cannot give set guidelines for when to see a doctor and when it is unnecessary because symptoms with the same cause vary too much and symptoms with different causes overlap too much. However, some problems clearly require a call to a health care professional.

Reasons to call a Doctor

When unsure about the need to see a doctor or other professional, people can sometimes call their primary care doctor for guidance. Some doctors can be contacted by e-mail for nonemergency questions. Others prefer to be contacted by telephone. Doctors cannot give set guidelines for when to see a doctor and when it is unnecessary because symptoms with the same cause vary too much and symptoms with different causes overlap too much. However, some problems clearly require a call to a health care professional.
Cold or Influenza

Vomiting or inability to keep fluids down

Painful swallowing

Coughing that lasts more than 2 or 3 weeks

Earache

Symptoms that last more than 7 days

Diarrhea

Black or bloody stools

More than 6 to 8 watery stools in children

Symptoms of dehydration (such as very dry mouth and armpits, confusion, and decreased urination), particularly in children and older people

Digestive problems

A feeling that food is stuck in the throat

Development of or change in heartburn, particularly during exercise

Frequent heartburn, belching, or regurgitation

Persistent or severe abdominal pain

Persistent nausea

General problems

Symptoms that prevent participation in usual activities, particularly new or worsened shortness of breath with exertion

Unexplained weight loss

Dizziness or an about-to-faint feeling

Persistent fatigue

Sweating, especially heavy or cold sweats

Headaches

Severe headache that peaks in intensity within seconds

Memory loss or confusion

Blurred or double vision

Slurred speech

Loss of balance or dizziness

Seizures

Numbness or weakness in the arms, legs, or face

Nausea

Heart problems

Rapid or galloping heartbeats (palpitations)

Chest pain

Leg problems

Pain in the calves that worsens when walking

Swelling in the ankles or legs

Menstrual problems

No periods by age 16

Sudden stopping of periods

A period that lasts much longer than usual or is excessively heavy

A sudden feeling of illness while using tampons

Severe or disabling cramps

Rash

Fever of 100.4° F (38° C) or above

A rash that is painful, involves swelling, or oozes

Sinusitis

Swelling or redness in or around an eye

Problems with vision

Vomiting

Moderate or severe abdominal pain

Symptoms of dehydration, particularly in children and older people

Green, black, or bloody vomit

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